Greetings

Hey there! I’m Austin — a writer, research consultant, and thinker.

If you’re looking for the website of Austin Hooe, then you are in the right place. If you just happened to stumble upon this page by a stroke of luck, feel free to stick around and get comfortable. This website will be dedicated to my research, essays, and any other projects that I’d like to share.

Education

I hold a Bachelor of Science in economics from George Mason University in Virginia. People that limit their education to formal schooling stifle their potential; life is a constant lecture in which we challenge ourselves and learn from the process. To feed my innate love for learning, I travel the world and try to meet new people. You would be amazed about what you can discover just by being actively curious about the world around us. The questions we ask are often more important than any answer. Obviously I read books on, well, everything.

Writing Experience

I started writing at a very young age. As early as the age of nine, I was writing stories about fictional worlds and mythical creatures. While I’m sure these works of fiction were no major feats, the habit of writing regularly allowed me to consistently improve to a professional level by the time I finished high school. During the following five years, I wrote articles and technical documents for tech companies to pay for my education.

I currently continue to write as a freelance writer and research consultant. Technology companies such as Cobalt Robotics, GreenKey Technologies, DeployBot, and Pleeder have hired me for my research and writing skills.


Visit my portfolio if you want to see my work.

Check out my Linkedin page or visit me on Upwork if you would like to learn about my professional background or hire me.

Here is my CV.


Research Interests

My research agenda is currently focused on understanding how the government’s role as the sole buyer in certain parts of the aerospace industry affects several topics concerning private companies. Here are some questions that I am looking to answer.

Do government contracts encourage companies to undercut their competition to secure contracts? Does this make the aerospace industry even more expensive than it already is? If so, how do high entry costs affect things like firm concentration, competition, and innovation?

I am also working on research that addresses reconciling commercial and scientific interests in the commons of space (e.g., low-earth orbit, planets, etc.).

Thanks for stopping by. If you have any questions or comments, just shout at me.

Cheers,

Austin